Koda’s Success Story

On March 11, 2015

Koda

Spartacus (now Koda) has found his forever home after a short stint at Dogtown Ranch in Elgin, Texas. He doesn’t look like he fared too poorly. Koda is now residing comfortably in Lakeway, Texas. Thanks to everyone who made this possible. This was one of the great ones at BARC! Love the photo with him sharing the bed with a kitty cat. And of course his trademark one floppy ear. I still think of the woman who passed him up because of that.

In the words of Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman: “Big mistake, huge!”

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LEAVING BARC ON JANUARY 24, 2015
A very doped up (post neuter) Spartacus takes his Freedom Ride today from BARC, thanks to transporter Lissa Maguirre. He will convalesce at a vet clinic in Sugar Land for the weekend, then Elizabeth Vitek gets the honor on Monday of driving this sweetheart to Dogtown Ranch, thanks to his savior Angela Sera. Great team effort all around by lots of folks.

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ORIGINAL PLEA

This has become an emergency when it shouldn’t have. My apologies for not getting this out sooner. I was working on an adoption for this baby in San Antonio but it’s not going to happen now because the family there just adopted another dog.

Spartacus is a MUST GRAB! I don’t say that about every dog I evaluate, so I’m putting my name on the line.

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I met him in North last weekend. It was obvious by the initial interaction that this dog welcomed any stranger coming up to his kennel with tail wagging and a very positive energy.
When a dog that I have just met comes barreling out of his kennel while I’m leashing him up, and I can grab his whole body immediately to stop him and leash him, and he has zero reaction to that, that’s the first good sign.

Spartacus walked well on the leash, he was ready to get some sunshine. I put him in the big run so he could really stretch his legs. When a human enters the run, he is immediately drawn to that person. Not needy, but loves human contact.

Spartacus is a big boy, has a beautiful straight back (sorry, not a fan of the sloped GSD back), solid body shape although it wouldn’t kill him to put on 10 or so pounds. His coat is in very good shape.

Spartacus also has pearly white teeth, no plaque detectable. It is quite possible he is younger than 2 years old. He did all his business outside. He takes treats very gingerly. He knows basic commands. I was able to grab his ears, tail, paws, mouth with zero reaction.

There is a woman who regularly comes to BARC, looking to adopt a young GSD male. I have worked with her before, but we haven’t had any when she’s been there. She was there Sunday and I immediately told her about Spartacus. They interacted beautifully in the big yard. He couldn’t have been more appropriate and exactly what she was looking for.

So why didn’t she adopt? Because one of Spartacus’ ears doesn’t stand up. I kid you not. Hey, I can’t judge, wait, yes, I can. This is silly. Who cares about a freaking ear?

I will say that with his one ear down, it gives him a bit of a softer, goofy look, as opposed to the intimidating look that only a GSD can possess when both of those ears are straight up at attention. Spartacus is still a really handsome dog, and that’s his only “knock”, one ear that doesn’t stand up. I’ll take that!

There was a smaller dog in the next run who wanted to play with Spartacus! The two of them just ran back and forth along the fenceline, jawing at each other. They appeared to be having such a good time. Spartacus never showed an aggressive side, just playful. No teeth gnarling against the fence, just an enjoyment of stretching his legs and playfully barking at the other dog, who was giving it as good as he got it right back. When I had him on leash, I let him meet several dogs and he was appropriate in his response each time. Not over the top, but definitely wanted to meet everything and everyone. No growling, barking, snarling, anything inappropriate.

A very nice young couple saw him outside late in the afternoon and became interested. They have a female GSD and wanted a playmate. I loved their interaction with him, the kind you wish every adopter at BARC had. The wife had zero hesitation handling a big dog. The husband was military, and he really liked Spartacus. We didn’t know his out date yet because he had just come in and the information wasn’t on the kennel card yet. I gave them a copy and told them to contact BARC to see about his stray hold. They didn’t live anywhere close, so it’s possible they found something somewhere else. They were also looking at a puppy GSD mix, and since they had a cat also, it’s possible they came back and settled for the puppy to play it safe. Of course we weren’t able to test Spartacus around kitties.

This boy cannot slip through the cracks. I couldn’t even fathom walking this sweet regal creature to Baydock. Please network him like crazy today. I have asked for him to be placed in Adoptions because he embodies exactly what we want going into the adoptions building. He is only low heartworm positive. Once you meet him, you can tell right away he was someone’s baby.

FRIENDS OF BARC WILL DONATE EITHER SPARTACUS’ FULL HEARTWORM TREATMENT AT BARC (OR THE EQUIVALENT RATE AT A PRIVATE VET CLINIC) or A 1-YEAR SUPPLY OF HEARTWORM PREVENTATIVE FROM BARC.

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